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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
, protect american jobs, and protect the middle class from the fiscal cliff. without spending cuts and entitlement reform, it will be impossible to address our country's debt crisis and get our economy going again and to create jobs. right now all eyes are on the white house. the country does not need a victory lap. it needs leadership. it is time for the president and congressional democrats to tell the american people what spending cuts they're willing to make. with that, i will take a few questions. [indiscernible] >> it has been very clear over the last year and a half. i have talked to the president about many of them. you can look at our budgets where we outlined specific proposals that we passed last year and the year before. we know what the menu is. we do not know what the white house is willing to do to get serious about solving our debt crisis. [indiscernible] >> i am not going to get into details, but it is very clear what kind of spending cuts need to occur, but we have no idea what the white house is willing to do. >> most public statements have been optimistic. we ar
on this fiscal cliff which has automatic tax hikes and spending cuts as of january one, they are trying to avert that. he says any deal on this must include an end to the debt ceiling all together. he wants complete power to raise the country's limit by himself. he doesn't want to have to get congressional approval. that is a demand stirring strong response from republicans today. >> the on way we ever cut spending is by using the debate over the debt limit to do it. now the president wants to remove that spur to cut all together. of course, it gets in the way of his spending plans. i can assure you it one happen. the american people want washington to get spending under control and the debt limit is the best tool we have to make the president take that demand seriously. the american people want us to fight to cut spending. it's a fight they deserve and a fight we are happy to have. >> joining me now, simon rosenberg. and mark theisen. guys, welcome. simon, let me start with you on this. we did have some democrats come on the show and say no, the president doesn't get to just decide when to rais
to listen in a little more to see what he has to say about the fiscal cliff and otherwise. >> entirely on spending cuts, or a variation that has emerged is that we can do so while still lowering rates by closing loopholes and deductions. and you've heard from my team but let me just repeat. we don't have any objection to tax reform, tax simplification. closing loopholes, closing deductions, but there is a bottom line, an amount of revenue that is required in order for us to get a real, meaningful deficit reduction plan that hits the numbers that are required for us to stabilize our debt and deficits. and -- [. [no audio] kwroe. jenna: we gave it our best shot. sometimes we can't do it. the president speaking at the white house at the business roundtable about the economy. fiscal cliff certainly the issue in the short term for a lot of big businesses and certainly for a lot of american taxpayers. however, long term is another story when it comes to the economy, and entitlements, the president referring to that as well. as we continue to get that feedback you can check it out foxnews.com
to zoraida sambolin for an update on the day's top stories. >> soledad, the fiscal cliff debacle, with 28 days remaining before drastic tax hikes and spending cuts take effect, a republican spending plan has been rejected by the white house. brianna keilar is live from washington. what now, brianna? >> well, right now it's about the pressure building and the clock kicking, zoraida. as house republicans in the white house try to ultimately broker a deal between two very different plans. house speaker john boehner's counteroffer, if you take a look at the headlines from this $800 billion in what would be savings from tax reform. so that is new tax revenue. but not done by increasing income tax rate on the wealthiest. but instead by closing tax loopholes, eliminating tax credits. and also $600 billion in health savings. that's what you'd get from entitlement reform. from reforming medicare, and doing some cuts there under this plan. but compare it to the white house plan, very different than what's on the table there. $1.6 trillion in new taxes. that is two times the amount in the boehner pl
to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff at the end of this month. a series of tax cuts and spending cuts set to kick in just 26 shopping days until the fiscal cliff. >> brian: less working days. >> steve: that's right. house republicans say there will be no deal if tax ritz go up and the obama administration says it's ready to go thelma and louise style over the cliff on january 1. if that's the case, wendell goler live at the white house with what we know is going on behind the scenes. anything happening? >> steve, the president and house speaker john boehner talked on the phone yesterday, but they agreed not to characterize their conversation. so it's unclear how much progress they made. from the outside, it does seem they've moved a bit closer with boehner now agreeing to raise tax collection from the wealthy, though not by raising tax rates. >> we've got to cut spending and i believe to put revenues on the table. the revenues we're putting on the table will come from, guess who, the rich! there are ways to limit deductions, close loopholes, and have the same people pay more of their mone
more focused on washington, on the whole policy issues around the fiscal cliff because they are trying to figure out their spending plans guessing what taxes will be. businesses are focused on if they spend x and taxed at y what's that going to leave them in terms of profitability. degree of which businesses have come off a really good four years where the rest of us have come off a more problematic four years. finally in this quarter partly because of the fiscal cliff, partly because of europe, partly because of slow down in china profits are more challenging for companies. but they are still making a lot of money. >> "wall street journal" study of 40 major companies half plan drastic cuts to their investments and spending into next. once a budget deal is reached, i mean whatever it is, do you think we'll see companies loosen their wallet? is there a bigger chance they will slow down more? >> part of this is contingent how well consumers do. companies will spend money if there's this active healthy consumer base that justifies them spending money for more activities. so, at some point
and where it fits in with the fiscal cliff. what we will spend money on and how we were tightened our belts. >> the major place it fits is the right policy would create an environment which would produce a lot more revenue. that would help to reduce the debt. the federal government doesn't spend much money on energy. energy research is about $6 billion a year. i would like to see it doubled. this report is a blueprint for independence and i think it is the right blueprint. we are not in a position to be held hostage by anybody. it also focuses on find more and use less. what we can do in the federal government is i think invest in research and getting a 500-mile battery for electric cars and getting solar energy that is 1 kilowatt installed and finding a way to capture carbon from coal plants that can be turned into fuel that is commercially sold. we should look at the model of unconventional gas in terms of how our system and federal research and our system of private properties have produced a situation where we have a massive advantage over europe and asia in terms of our natural gas. it
pelosi says congress should address the fiscal cliff in two stages. first lawmaker shoes agree to spending cuts and an infrastructure package along with passing the middle class tax cut. she says tax and entitlement reform would then come in the next year. mean while christine lagarde says she's hopeful an agreement can be found. >> are you confident that they will reach an agreement? >> i have to come to talk about the fiscal cliff? practicing matti >> we all have fiscal cliff fatigue. >> yeah, i think it's totally understandable, but it still hasn't been dealt with as we've just seen. we think there will be a fiscal slide. we have kind of three scenarios in find. a full fiscal cliff, a bunny slope or something in the middle, a fiscal slide. and i think that's where we're headed. we believe it will be in the neighborhood of 1.5% of gdp in fiscal adjustment and i think that's obviously better than the full lack of 4.5. and it's better than -- worse than something that wouldn't make too much difference. 1.5 will make an important difference still. >> and what's in that 1.5% in t
of about 9% across defense and all domestic spending. that is the fiscal cliff. we shouldn't be dealing with other issues that are long term in order to avert the cliff as it were. that is immediate crisis. we have long term situation --. bill: but you know when lawmakers get a little bit of rope, you know, when they get time to think about it and push it off to the next year, it never gets done. this budget proposal, there are many who wonder whether or not even democrats could support it. the last budget that came from the white house went to the senate, it went 98-0 against it. no one voted for it. melissa: well, that was kind of a tricky parliamentary issue as well but, i do take issue with one thing, the idea we haven't dealt with entightments. we had two years, a year and a half we debated medicare. we made significant changes in medicare. we just had a campaign which republicans including governor romney time after time after time charged that we had cut $616 billion in spending out of medicare and we reformed the program. we have looking toward new ways to compensate providers.
of this year. then, senator orrin hatch from utah gives the republican address on the fiscal cliff which refers to automatic tax increases and spending cuts that would go into effect in 2013. >> hi, everybody. i'm here on the factory floor of a business in hatfield, pennsylvania, where folks are working around the clock making toys to keep up with the christmas rush. and i came here because, back in washington, the clock is ticking on some important decisions that will have a real impact on our businesses - and on families like yours. the most pressing decision has to do with your taxes. see, at the end of the year, middle-class tax cuts are set to expire. and there are two things that can happen. first, if congress does nothing, every family will see their income taxes automatically go up at the beginning of next year. a typical middle class family of four will see their income taxes rise by $2,200. we can't let that happen. our families can't afford it, and neither can our economy. the second option is better. right now, congress can pass a law that would prevent a tax hike on the first $250,
over the fiscal cliff or whether a deal is reached to avert that, middle class taxes are going up, and so is spending. so there's a lot of cynicism in this process. >> real quick -- >> that's why the president has the edge. >> bottom line, the republicans are poised to take a fall? is that what your numbers show you? >> they are poised to take a hit on this right now. longer term, tim pact will weigh on the obama administration if the economy doesn't recover. >> all right. many thanks, scott rasmussen, appreciate it very much. >> thanks. >>> with just 26 days until we fall off the tax and fiscal cliff, two dozen house republicans have apparently defected from the boehner plan and signed a bipartisan letter with democrats. people are now asking is there a fallback position for the gop? well, here now to tell us is house majority whip california republican kevin mccarthy, the number three man. mr. mccarthy, as always, thank you for coming back on the show. can i get your comment on this letter, two dozen republicans, they're talking about tax rate flexibility along with a bunch of d
having meaningful discussions on that. i'm suffering from fiscal cliff fatigue i think it will get worse because the end of the year is approaching. melissa: thank you for coming on. lori: way to bring it home. spending cuts, looking at even more spending or the possibility of that. housing secretary donovan branding how he hopes to avoid a government bailout for the fha. it seems like more dollar signs out there to me, peter. >> that is right. the housing secretary cannot rule it out. washington is certainly closer to one after the latest audit of the fha fund has a capital reserve shortfall of $16.3 billion. the administration says it is too soon to say whether the fha will need treasury funding. >> can you assure us and the american people today as the secretary of hud and fha will not do that, or you don't know yet? >> senator, i wish i had a crystal ball and i could tell you we won't at the end of the year given the reports. obviously i am highly concerned about that possibility. >> to avoid a bailout agency is increasing fees and making other reforms. the administration says it wil
to hammer out a deal over tax hikes and spending cuts as the clock particulars towards that fiscal cliff deadline on january 11. mike emanuel is live. we are still getting hard lines from either side about where they stand on this. what is really happening behind the closed doors? are they closer to a dole? >> reporter: jenna you're right about a lot of tough talk in public, but behind closed doors we know the president, the speaker of the house john boehner had a phone call late yesterday, the first call they had in a week. there has not been much in the way of leaks as to what was discussed. most folks on capitol hill may suggest that no leaks means they are getting down to serious movement on finding a compromise to avert the fiscal cliff. because in public the treasury secretary was asked yesterday if the administration is prepared to go over the fiscal cliff. check this out. >> is the administration prepared to go over the fiscal cliff. >> absolutely. we see no prospects for an agreement that doesn't involve those rates going up on the top 2% of the wealthist. remember it's only 2%.
the state of kentucky. senator paul, welcome, as always. i want to ask you about the fiscal cliff, the state of play. there's revenues on the table. there's tax rate increases on the table. i don't know if there's spending on the table. what's your thinking prigt now? >> that it's a really, really bad idea to raise taxes. if you want your economy to grow, you should do the opposite. we have to cut taxes. that's how i'd fix the economy. leave more money in the private sector. the president is adamant about raising taxes and he's dead wrong. >> there are some people saying we need a deal to avoid a huge tax increase but year end that would throw us into recession. just a thought, would you compromise in terms of let's say a smaller tax rate increase -- let's say the top rate goes to 37% instead of 40%, maybe the threshold goads es to $500,000 $750,000 rather than $250,000? does that interest you? >> no. but what about means testing for entitlement. why don't we say the rich get less social security and they pay more for their medicare? it meets the president's animus that we must get more mone
in a balanced agreement, he's not particularly interested in avoiding the fiscal cliff, and he's clearly not interested at all in cutting any spending. what the president is really interested in, as we learned just yesterday, is getting as much taxpayer money as he can, first, by raising taxes on small business that he believes are making too much money and then on everybody else, not so he can lower the debt or the deficit but so he can spend to his heart's contefnlts for months the president has been saying all he wants is to raise taxes on the top 2% so he can tackle the debt and the deficit. however, yesterday he finally revealed that's not really his true intent. by demanding the power to raise the debt limit whenever he wants, by as much as he wants, he showed what he's really after is assuming unprecedented power to spend taxpayer dollars without any limit at all. this isn't about getting a handle on deficits or debt for him. it's about spending even more than he already has. why else would he demand the power to raise the debt limit on his own? by the way, why on earth would we e
from a fiscal cliff? >> congresswoman, i am a financial illiterate, can you explain to me how you have all encompassing tax reform without taking a look at tax rates? >> well, we have. we believe that we need tax reform. we'd like to look at tax rates, we'd like to look at the loopholes, the tax credits. we want a simpler, less costly tax code for america. that's important for middle class families, important for our economy. that is what's going to help get this economy growing again. but we also -- it also republicans believe it has to include the spending. and the way congress has operated in the past, you know, yeah, we'll increase revenue, but then there's never the protections, never the tough decisions to actually cut the spending, reduce the debt, and that has to be a part of this one. >> fair enough. arianna? >> congresswoman, in your thanksgiving message, twice you emphasize the need for jobs, the need for growth, and then you mentioned the deficit. what do you think we should be doing right now to help create jobs and bring about greater growth? >> well, one of the first thi
months of hearing about the fiscal cliff, there are no signs of a compromise plan. let's bring in senior congressional correspondent miss dana bash. dana? republicans say president obama's opening offer is, you know, all take and no give here. do they feel like the president is wasting their time? >> reporter: yes. they do. and, you know, a lot of times when we see this kind of toing and froing in public, don, it masks what is really going on behind the scenes, which is real negotiating. so i asked that question of john boehner, who has been through this kind of negotiating many, many times over many years, if that's what we're seeing or if we're at a stalemate. listen to this . the past 24 hours, is this the necessary public posturing that needs to go on to get an endgame or is there serious stalemate right now? >> there is a stalemate. let's not kid ourselves. i'm not trying to make this more difficult, but if you watched me over the last three weeks, i've been very girded in what i have to say because i don't want to make it harder for me or the president or members of both parties to
cliff. we now know that we're 29 days away before the massive spending cuts and tax increases go into effect automatically the beginning of the year. the white house presented their plan and now just today we're getting news on the side of the republicans. ali velshi, chief business correspondent, let me bring you in. the first major difference, let's be crystal clear and run through this proposition, the fact that they want to extend the bush era tax cuts for everybody. >> right. something that some 67% of americans said that they don't agree with, something the white house says is a nonstarter. however, they have put a proposal forward. i suppose if you're negotiating, you don't put first proposal forward, the one you're going to end up with. this is from house speaker john boehner in a 2 1/2 page letter to the president, it proposes $2.2 trillion in cuts. and let me show you how they get there. $800 billion in tax reform. that is closing loopholes and credits. $600 billion in health care and medicare changes. $300 billion in other mandatory savings. $300 billion in discretiona
over the fiscal cliff. if you're really going to be serious about deficit reduction, it can't just be about taxes. it has to be about spending cuts, too. >> prince william and wife catherine is out of the hospital after being admitted for acute morning sickness. >> told the hospital stay would last at few days and that's exactly what it turned out to be. >>> software executive john mcafee no longer a fugitive. arre arrested after his neighbor was murdered. >> police didn't know where he was. >> now that marijuana is legal here in washington, the state will going to start cleshgting taxes on it. >> gangnam style. >> there is no one in political life funnier than alan simpson. >> mayor michael bloomberg announced new york will hold a contest to redesign the city's pay phones. now, a brand new -- >> "eye-opener" at 8:00 is brought to you by the aarp. >>> i'm charlie rose with gayle king and norah o'donnell. this morning, prince william's wife catherine is back home in london after three days in the hospital. >> the pregnant duchess of cambridge was being treated for an acute form of m
presenting a plan to avoid the fiscal cliff. first and foremost, avoiding increasing and eliminating deductions on of her earnings to raise an additional $8 billion. $1.2 trillion in new spending cuts. the white house, no surprise, already rejecting the plan. the president saying the gop plan is out of bounds because it does not include higher taxes on the wealthy. we are joined now by a chief economist. why does it seem the only solution to be satisfied with is to raise taxes on the wealthy? >> they clearly staked out this position during the campaign. they feel they have a mandate for it. i am sort of skeptical. the sticking point is the tax rate question on the wealthy. however, with that said, progress has been made in the sense that the republicans are not willing to raise taxes, not rates, on the rich. democrats are saying they are more open to entitlement cuts, if you will, reform, whatever you want to call it. they are making progress. [talking over each other] the question is: you know, how far are both sides willing to go down to the wire to avoid this. whether it is the d
to see us go over the fiscal cliff, but feel very strongly we've got to get serious here. we don't want to increase tax rates. we're not going to increase tax rates. and we want to do something about the spending problem. and remember, the good will, the piece that is, i think, determinive here, the speaker's put new revenues on the table just after the election and said we get it. the president won his re- election. we won ours. we have to now come together. here is our proposal to the speaker -- to the president that we were unwilling to give a year and a half ago. >> they know they need to put revenant on the table, but will you come back and give them the entitlement cuts? >> we will take this as a serious matter. this is not a game. we are interested in trying to solve the problem for the american people so that we do not see taxes go up on anybody, so we can engage in reform, get the economy going again. we're not playing a game. that offer yesterday was not serious. thank you. >> this is about 20 minutes. >> good afternoon. i'm here today with my colleague. i invited him here to
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)